Partner (Sabbatical)
David Diez co-founded OpenIntro and focuses his time on web and product development. He is a quantitative analyst in the SF Bay Area.
Chris Barr co-founded OpenIntro and is currently on sabbatical. He was previously an Assistant Professor at Harvard University and is currently studying business at Yale University.
Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel is a co-author on the textbook and also develops supporting material such as labs. She is an Assistant Professor of the Practice at Duke University.
Andrew Bray develops statistics labs. He is a statistics post-doc at the Five Colleges Consortium and is teaching at Smith College.
Meenal Patel is a graphic designer for a firm in Minneapolis, MN, and she designed the OpenIntro website and regularly provides design support for OpenIntro resources.
Leah Dorazio is developing an Advanced Placement (AP) edition of OpenIntro Statistics. She teaches Statistics and Computer Science at San Francisco University High School.
Shannon Pileggi develops content for OpenIntro videos, and she is a faculty member in the Cal Poly Statistics Department.
Rebecca Wolfson works on OpenIntro's social media presence and media strategy. She is a content producer at a San Francisco non-profit.
Edwin Chen works on the OpenIntro website and other tech products. He is working on a startup in the SF Bay Area.
Matt Thomas has joined OpenIntro to expand the softwares we support in OpenIntro Labs. He is an assistant professor at Ithaca College.
Thank You
Albert Y. Kim develops statistics labs. He will be an Assistant Professor of Statistics at Middlebury College as of September 2015.
David Diez (president), Mark Hansen, David Harrington, Jeremy Kraut-Ordover (treasurer and secretary), Shannon McClintock.
We are very grateful to the friends of OpenIntro who have volunteered along the way:

Chris Pope (past volunteer) helped develop a trial internship program at OpenIntro.

David Laffie (past volunteer) helped manage the OpenIntro Forums content curator.

Yongtao Guan (past fellow) provided advice and mentorship to the team.

Filipp Brunshteyn (past fellow) provided guidance and support in developing project strategy.

Luke Paulsen (past intern/volunteer) performed and described analyses to highlight interesting data sets.

Sarah McGovern (past volunteer) helped jump-start the videos for OpenIntro Statistics.

Rob Gould (past fellow) provided advice and mentorship to the team.

We would also like to gratefully acknowledge Arnold & Porter LLP, and in particular the talented members of their staff, including Maxwell C. Preston, Daniel Bernstein, and Louis S. Ederer, who have generously provided pro bono legal counsel in areas of copyright, intellectual property, and general corporate law.
You can support us by becoming a member of the Foundation for Open Access Statistics, and by contributing on their donation page.
Frequently Asked Questions
Information on Rights of use may be found in its own section. Additional information about OpenIntro may be found at our Blog. Statistics questions may be posted in the Public Forums.
How are resources tested?
The textbook and other resources have been tested by a wide range of instructors. For example, our textbooks have been used in high schools and at dozens of colleges, from Edmonds Community College in Washington to Princeton University in New Jersey to the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad, India. The feedback we've received from both students and teachers help us constantly improve the textbook and our other resources.
How is OpenIntro different?
Innovation is often driven by enthusiasm, not money. Our staff has volunteered thousands of hours to develop the best resources and make them available for free. It is our mission to make educational materials available and accessible to everyone. We believe this is why OpenIntro has been a success: teachers can relate to our values, they recognize our high standards, and they enjoy knowing every student in their classroom can access and afford the course materials.
How can I contribute?
There are many ways to get involved or support the movement.
1. Use open-source resources, and provide feedback to help those resources improve.
2. Be an advocate for open-source resources. Let other people know that open-source resources offer benefits over expensive alternatives: free and perpetual access for all students before, during, and after the course.
3. If you are interested in becoming actively involved, send one of our staff members an email to introduce yourself. We're always looking expand OpenIntro to include new people, projects, and ideas.
Sincerely Yours,